Muscles In The Lower Body

This is the first of many articles in the series called strength training for women. In order to get started with strength training, it is important to know what muscles you are working out. It’s a lot of information and it’s going to be a long post, but you’re going to thank yourself for it later. This is just a general overview of the muscles and I will create an in-depth article of the muscles later on. Makes sense? Let’s get started!

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Hip Musculature 

 

Piriformis

-Located under the gluteus maximus

-Helps rotate the hips

 

 

Sartorius

-The longest muscle in the human body

-The muscle is long and thin and stretches the length of the thigh

-Helps flex, abduct and rotate the hip and flexes the knee

 

 

IIliacus 

-Its function is to rotate and flex the hips

-Responsible for maintaining proper posture

 

Psoas 

-Connects your torso to your legs

-Stabilizes your spine and assists in hip flexion and rotation

-If this muscle tightens then it results in lower back pain

 

 

Tensor Fascia Latae (including the Iliotibial Band)

-Helps to maintain one foot ahead of the other while walking

-It is a hip flexor and helps to turn one leg towards the other

 

 

Gluteus Maximus

-Strongest muscle in the human body

-Responsible for movement of the hip and thigh

 

 

Gluteus Minimus

-Located beneath the gluteus medius

-Smallest of the 3 gluteal muscles

-Internally rotates the hip and is a hip abductor

 

Gluteus Medius 

-One of the 3 gluteal muscles situated on the outer surface of the pelvis

-Provides rotation of the thigh outward from center of the body

 

Pectineus 

-Small muscle in the mid-thigh of the leg

-Hip adductor (inwards towards the body)

-Is a hip flexor

 

Gracilis

-Found in the groin

-Acts as a hip adductor and helps flexes the leg at the knee

-Is a hip flexor

 

Adductor Brevis

-Located behind the pectineus and adductor longus

-Help adduct the thigh at hip joint

-Is a hip flexor

 

 

Adductor Magnus-Posterior Fibers

-Is a hip adductor

-Assists in extending the hips

Adductor Magnus-Anterior Fibers

-Pulls the hips towards the midline of the body

-Fundamental for running, and sprinting

-Is a hip flexor

 

Adductor Longus

-Found in the inner thigh 

-Controls the thigh bone’s ability to move inwards towards the body

-Strain in the adductor longus can cause difficulty walking, pain while seated

-Is a hip flexor

 

Quadriceps

Rectus Femoris

-Connected to the hips

-Helps extend and raise the knee

-It is the only muscle that can flex the hips

-Muscle overuse can be from kicking or sprinting

 

Vastus Intermedius 

-Located along the upper portion of the femur on the front part of the femur

-Helps in extending the knee

 

Vastus Medialis

-Located in front of the thigh 

-Helps in extending the knee

-Can be strengthened by squats, leg presses, and extensions

 

Vastus Lateralis

-Located on the side of the thigh 

-The largest of the quadriceps group

-Helps in extending the knee

 

Hamstring Complex

Semitendinosus

-Located on the back of the thigh

-Works to flex the knee and extend the hips

 

Semimembranosus 

-Located in the back of the thigh

-Works to flex the knee and extend the hips

 

 

Bicep Femoris-Short Head

-Located in the back of the thigh

-Flexes the knee

 

Bicep Femoris-Long Head

-Located in the back of the thigh

-Flexes the knee

-Rotates the thigh outward

 

Lower Leg Musculature 

 

Peroneus Longus

-Located on the outside of the lower leg

-Helps support the arch of the foot

-Help turn feet outward 

 

Gastrocnemius 

-Located on the back of the lower leg

-Moves foot downward

-Involved with standing, walking, running, and jumping

 

Soleus 

-Involved with standing or walking

-Is used for pushing off the ground while walking or standing on toes

-Vital to everyday activities, such as running, jogging, or walking

 

Posterior Tibialis

-Moves foot downward and help moves foot away from each other

-Any dysfunction can lead to flat feet

 

Anterior Tibialis 

-Moves foot upward and inward

 

 

That’s all the muscles! Now you can use this information to help you train smarter. Next, I will make posts to help you train all of these muscles. Subscribe to my email list to get the latest updates! Til’ next time!

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